Monday graph: 30000 Brits claim unemployment benefits in EU countries

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Fresh from the Guardian!

EU_Unemployment_DatablogThere’s some data missing that may be relevant (I’m thinking especially about Britons claiming unemployment benefits in the Netherlands) but it’s still very interesting.

One thing the graph does very well is to remind us that yes, British people on benefits in EU countries do exist, it doesn’t only happen the other way around.

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Monday Graph: UKIP Maths

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This Monday, I’m featuring a very interesting and witty resource I discovered on Twitter: UKIP Maths are debunking affirmation made by UKIP members in their campaigns, and fighting them with cold hard facts.

Let’s look first at this graph; column on the left shows the Government’s estimates of the percentage of the UK population born overseas; the column on the right is from a 2013 ONS poll and shows the percentage of the UK population that respondents intending to vote UKIP at the next elections believe was born overseas.

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(In case you’re wondering, the general public estimated the number of foreign-born people in the UK as higher than the actual figure, at around 25%; but UKIP supporters overestimate it by a wider margin).

So, UKIP supporters tend to think there are much more immigrants in the country than there actually are. Fair enough.

But it gets more interesting…

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Monday Graph: attitudes to immigration by political party

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Courtesy of British Future (via)

In a poll carried out by Ipsos Mori for British Future, people were asked: to give the contribution of immigration to Britain on a score of 0 (entirely negative) to 10 (entirely positive).

The results are below

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What we see:

-Roughly about 1 in 5 of all voters gave immigration a 0; about 1 in 4 gave it a score higher than 7

-UKIP voters quite unsurprisingly stand out in that 41% gave it a 0 and only 5% (so one in 20) 7 or higher.

-Conservative voters cover the anti-immigration side and middle ground quite evenly, but they are unlikely to give immigration a score higher than 7

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Monday Graph: Aheists, Jews and Mormons most knowledgeable about religions

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Jay Livingston at Sociological Images writes about a Pew quiz on religious knowledge.

Turns out, it is the Atheists and Agnostics who scored best on the quiz, followed closely by Jews and Mormons; whereas Catholics and Protestants seem to fall behind.

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As for the explanation, Livingston has got a quite provocative-one:

“One reason for their higher scores might be education – college graduates outscore high school or less by nearly 8 points out of 32. It may be that nonbelievers, Jews, and Mormons are more likely to have finished college. […]

But another reason that these groups scored higher may be their position as religious minorities. Jews and Mormons have to explain to the flock how their ideas are different from those of the majority. Atheists and agnostics too, in their questioning and even rejecting,  have probably devoted more thought to religion, or more accurately, religions. On the questions about Shiva and Nirvana, they leave even the Jews and Mormons far behind.

For Protestants and Catholics, by contrast, learning detailed information about their religion is not as crucial. Just as White people in the US rarely ask what it means to be White, Christians need not worry about their differences from the mainstream. They are the mainstream.”

Read Jay Livingston’s full article here.

Monday Graph: Happiness and Human Development Accross the World

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In July this year, The Economist’s Graphic Detail blog has looked at the relation between Human Development Index (which ranks countries by life expectancy, education and income per person) and reported feelings of happiness /positive emotions, as reported in a Gallup poll.

happiness hdi

(click on the image to see the interactive map and read the original Economist article)

At first sight, there does not seem to be much of a link between HDI and experiencing feelings of happiness; apart from noting that people in Latin American/Carribean countries appear to experience positive feelings more often and in South, Central Asia and non-EU Europe less often, interesting patterns are not readily visible.

However, let’s look a bit more closely.

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Monday Graph: The Scottish Independence Referendum and the collapse of the Conservative vote in Scotland

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Well here we are, just 3 days lef to the Scottish Independence Referendum. Just until last month, it looked like the “Yes” vote was hardly approaching 40%, let alone stand any chance. Then September came and suddenly the possibility looks much more real; with that one Sunday Times Poll showing the Yes Campaign taking the lead with 51%; followed by two Survation and one ICM/Guardian polls indicating the No Campaign is back ahead- but only by an ever-so-slightly margin. (You can track Independence Referendum poll results here)

So, in other words…

How did we get here? A thought-provoking article on the Economist’s ‘Graphic Detail’ blog suggests that “An energetic campaign by the nationalists over the past months is one explanation. But the underlying causes go back much further. They lie in long-term shifts in the Scottish electoral landscape.”

Let’s look at the graphs published by the Economist:

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Monday graph: US Muslims more likely than any other group to believe violence against civilians “never justified”.

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313744_v1Found this image on Cracked.com, courtesy of Michael Voli; and the source appears to be this 2010 Gallup poll.

Here are the original graphs with less frills:

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This is very obviously quite useful for debunking the “Muslims in the Western world support terrorism” scare rhetoric. What I find particularly interesting, on the other hand, is that Muslim Americans are the religious group with the least discrepancy between opinions on whether a small group is ever justified in violence against civilians and whether the military is ever justified in killing non-combatants.

This may be quite telling of how Muslims in general being associated with terrorism in public discourse is, in turn, shaping their own opinions and reactions: on the one hand, they may feel a need to disassociate themselves from the very idea of terrorism, in a way that -say- Christians or the non-religious do not; on the other hand, if military action in the name of “the war on terror” is to harm and kill innocent civilians, it may be that they fear more than any other group that it would be their own people.